Archive | Quotes & Insights

Murray Bookchin: Anthropocentrism versus biocentrism – a false dichotomy

Murray Bookchin: Anthropocentrism versus biocentrism – a false dichotomy

[Quotes and Insights #24] Introduction by Ian Angus — Some green writers, particularly those who support the viewpoint known as deep ecology, accuse socialist environmentalists of anthropocentrism, of giving absolute priority to human needs and ignoring or downplaying the needs of non-human nature. To that, they counterpose what is variously called biocentrism or ecocentrism – the […]

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"I paint what I see," said Rivera

Celebrating the 125th anniversary of the birth of the great Mexican muralist and revolutionary socialist, Diego Rivera. In 1933, Diego Rivera painted the mural shown above, Man at the Crossroads, in Rockefeller Center in New York City. Multimillionaire Nelson Rockefeller demanded that it be changed to remove the portraits of Lenin, Trotsky, Marx and Engels. Rivera refused, and […]

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Rosa Luxemburg: Reform versus Revolution

[Quotes and Insights #21] Thanks to Luna17 for reminding us of this brilliant passage from the woman Lenin described as one of the  “outstanding representatives of the revolutionary proletariat and of unfalsified Marxism.” Legislative reform and revolution are not different methods of historic development that can be picked out at the pleasure from the counter […]

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Murray Bookchin: Ecological problems are social problems

[Quotes and Insights #19] by Murray Bookchin What defines social ecology as social is its recognition of the often-overlooked fact that nearly all our present ecological problems arise from deep-seated social problems. Conversely, our present ecological problems cannot be clearly understood, much less resolved, without resolutely dealing with problems within society. To make this point […]

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Lester Thurow: Why good capitalist decisions mean ecological suicide

[Quotes and Insights #17] This quote is particularly telling because the author is trying save capitalism from itself. Nowhere is capitalism’s time horizon problem more acute than in the area of global environmentalism … What should a capitalistic society do about longrun environmental problems such as global warming or ozone depletion? … Using capitalist decision […]

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Vandana Shiva: Soil Not Oil

[Quotes & Insights #16] (I’ve been reading Soil Not Oil by the always thoughtful and inspiring Vandana Shiva. Here are five passages I copied down while reading. -IA) (p. 4) The dominant model of development and globalization is inherently violent. By bringing back dignified work based on land, and livelihoods. By bringing back dignified work […]

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Barry Commoner: Pollution and production

[Quotes & Insights #15] From the Introduction to the 1992 edition of Making Peace With the Planet, by Barry Commoner “The assault on environmental quality results from the use of systems of production that yield useful goods but also generate pollutants. “The engines that power modern cars and trucks also produce pollutants that turn into […]

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Mark Twain: Misusing numbers

 [Quotes and Insights #12] (As regular C&C readers know, I have recently written several articles on the misuse of numbers and statistics by the overpopulation lobby. I’m sure Mark Twain never thought about that subject, but the following passage from his Life on the Mississippi, published in 1883, seems very relevant today – especially the final […]

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Daniel Dorling: Are the super-rich human?

[Quotes and Insights #11] “Places rarely suffer from having too many people, but frequently suffer from a few people taking far too much. By early 2008 it became evident that preceding the economic crash, the acquisition of most of the world’s remaining available land was occurring at rates never seen before. Huge swathes were being […]

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Daniel Dorling: What the ruling class believes

[Quotes and Insights #9] From Injustice: Why Social Inequality Persists, by Daniel Dorling The five tenets of injustice are that: elitism is efficient, exclusion is necessary, prejudice is natural, greed is good and despair is inevitable. Because of widespread and growing opposition to the five key unjust beliefs, including the belief that so many should now be ‘losers’, […]

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